1 hour ago • 100 notes • Reblog
1 hour ago • 655 notes • Reblog

ARROOOOOW

WHAAAAT THE HELLLL!???!??

OH MY GOD.

(Source: arachnephoto)

2 hours ago • 29,989 notes • Reblog

(Source: artballin)

2 hours ago • 100,324 notes • Reblog

sourgoat:

yes

3 hours ago • 22,860 notes • Reblog

When I throw a punch, I mean it.

(Source: sonofdragons)

4 hours ago • 1,079 notes • Reblog

ericnorseman:

Beyond Good and Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche inspired by (x)
5 hours ago • 2,778 notes • Reblog

uncleclustersthirdbrain:

lastnamewayne:

I know exactly what you mean. It’s like when I talk to actors or if I were to talk to directors that I wish I could some day work with. I think the trick lies in approaching them not as a fan, but as you say, a peer. Be endearing and let your ambition show. Nothing wrong with letting them know you admire their work, but it’s about finding a balance, I guess. Not just approaching them and being like “holy shit, dude, I absolutely love your work! Can I get your autograph?” right off the bat. People handle those situations differently, I’m sure you’ll find a way to make it work. :3

I also feel like there’s a degree of lacking that factors into a fan’s perspective as opposed to a creator’s perspective. We, as fans, generally haven’t made anything of our own that could be considered comparable to the person we look up to. It’ll probably get easier with some work tucked under our belts that might inspire other fans to treat us the way we treat creators nowadays. 

Agreed! But at this stage, where we’re learning and getting to know more about our style in our potential career path and all of that, getting connections is the most important thing, and I feel like with all the people you’re meeting, you’re well on your way into something great. I think that a vital thing about being a fan and approaching these people who have made a name for themselves and that we admire so much, is keeping in mind that they too were in our position once. At least for the most part. They too looked up to people while they were still learning and actually still do look up to people as professionals. Keeping that in mind helps a lot, I think. 

5 hours ago • 3 notes • Reblog

uncleclustersthirdbrain:

I feel my mind kind of go mushy on me when talking to creators and I have no fucking idea why that happens. 

I like your work and appreciate the shit that you do???????

I guess it’s a “i feel nervous around you because I’d like to one day be considered a peer and I feel like by saying anything off hand or odd I’m jeopardizing my chances of making that happen” type of thing and yo yeah don’t make a fool of yourself but be endearing in a way that has made you friends and shit

And this isn’t me angry, like, no way just being able to talk to people is the coolest thing ever. Just sometimes you don’t want to come off as unable to work your way through a conversation.

What’s funny is there are times when I meet creators and have no problem just shooting the shit with them— and you really want that to be a consistent feeling in all your conversations with the people who bring this amazing characters and stories to life, but it just doesn’t want to work that way. 

image

Ah well— I’m gonna keep reading my film book with the excess of pictures and stage directions while my mind tries to subconsciously devise a way to turn itself off in times of nervousness. 

I know exactly what you mean. It’s like when I talk to actors or if I were to talk to directors that I wish I could some day work with. I think the trick lies in approaching them not as a fan, but as you say, a peer. Be endearing and let your ambition show. Nothing wrong with letting them know you admire their work, but it’s about finding a balance, I guess. Not just approaching them and being like “holy shit, dude, I absolutely love your work! Can I get your autograph?” right off the bat. People handle those situations differently, I’m sure you’ll find a way to make it work. :3

5 hours ago • 3 notes • Reblog